The 2016 Bayley Bulletin Sonnet Contest

The 2016 Bayley Bulletin Sonnet Contest

Round 3 | Grade 12 Finalists

Katharine Caughron

Katharine Caughron

Mary Magdalene Speaks

First Place

Mary Busse

Mary Busse

Magdalen's Daybreak

Second Place

Round 3 | Grade 11 Finalists

Charles Foyle

Charles Foyle

Sonnet based on Chapter 20 of St John’s Gospel

First Place

Rebecca Plummer

Rebecca Plummer

Mary

Second Place

Round 3 | Grade 10 Finalists

Mary Clare Young

Mary Clare Young

If Thou Will Come

First Place

Christen Ruiz

Christen Ruiz

Ex Nocte

Second Place

Round 3 | Grade 9 Finalists

Maria Pratt

Maria Pratt

He Called to Me

First Place

Anna Regnier

Anna Regnier

The Perfect Morning

Second Place

Round 3 | Grade 12 Finalists

Mary Busse

Mary Busse

Magdalen's Daybreak

Katharine Caughron

Katharine Caughron

Mary Magdalene Speaks

Round 3 | Grade 11 Finalists

Charles Foyle

Charles Foyle

Sonnet based on Chapter 20 of St John’s Gospel

Rebecca Plummer

Rebecca Plummer

Mary

Round 3 | Grade 10 Finalists

Sophia Olomi

Sophia Olomi

The Rock's Redemption

John Regnier

John Regnier

Tale of the Tomb

Christen Ruiz

Christen Ruiz

The Rock's Redemption

Mary Clare Young

Mary Clare Young

If Thou Will Come

Round 3 | Grade 9 Finalists

Olivia Pickering

Olivia Pickering

The Empty Tomb

Maria Pratt

Maria Pratt

He Called to Me

Anna Regnier

Anna Regnier

The Perfect Morning

Round 2 | Grade 12 Finalists

Mary Busse

Mary Busse

Magdalen's Daybreak

Katharine Caughron

Katharine Caughron

Mary Magdalene Speaks

Katelyn Daniels

Katelyn Daniels

The Empty Tomb

Jessica Neddersen

Jessica Neddersen

The Gardener Tabernacle

Teresa Regnier

Teresa Regnier

The Gift of Easter Eyesight

Round 2 | Grade 11 Finalists

Charles Foyle

Charles Foyle

Sonnet based on Chapter 20 of St John’s Gospel

Rebecca Plummer

Rebecca Plummer

Mary

Zoe Krauskopf

Zoe Krauskopf

No Hallowed Ground

Natalie Pratt

Natalie Pratt

The Good Gardener

Round 2 | Grade 10 Finalists

Sophia Olomi

Sophia Olomi

The Rock's Redemption

John Regnier

John Regnier

Tale of the Tomb

Christen Ruiz

Christen Ruiz

Ex Nocte

Mary Clare Young

Mary Clare Young

If Thou Will Come

Round 2 | Grade 9 Finalists

Olivia Pickering

Olivia Pickering

The Empty Tomb

Maria Pratt

Maria Pratt

He Called to Me

Anna Regnier

Anna Regnier

The Perfect Morning

Round 1 | Grade 12 Finalists

Mary Busse

Mary Busse

Magdalen's Daybreak

Katharine Caughron

Katharine Caughron

Mary Magdalene Speaks

Katelyn Daniels

Katelyn Daniels

The Empty Tomb

Jessica Neddersen

Jessica Neddersen

The Gardener Tabernacle

Teresa Regnier

Teresa Regnier

The Gift of Easter Eyesight

Round 1 | Grade 11 Finalists

Charles Foyle

Charles Foyle

Sonnet based on Chapter 20 of St John’s Gospel

Rebecca Plummer

Rebecca Plummer

Mary

Zoe Krauskopf

Zoe Krauskopf

No Hallowed Ground

Natalie Pratt

Natalie Pratt

The Good Gardener

Armando Sanchez

Armando Sanchez

MTTomb

Round 1 | Grade 10 Finalists

Julia Morris

Julia Morris

Rise Up!

Sophia Olomi

Sophia Olomi

The Rock's Redemption

Gianna Pavey

Gianna Pavey

The Empty Tomb

John Regnier

John Regnier

Tale of the Tomb

Christen Ruiz

Christen Ruiz

Ex Nocte

Mary Clare Young

Mary Clare Young

If Thou Will Come

Round 1 | Grade 9 Finalists

Martha Anderson

Martha Anderson

Christ's Empty Tomb

Emily Henderson

Emily Henderson

Christ the Gardener

Olivia Pickering

Olivia Pickering

The Empty Tomb

Maria Pratt

Maria Pratt

He Called to Me

Anna Regnier

Anna Regnier

The Perfect Morning

Mary Szymanski

Mary Szymanski

The Discovery of Death's Defeat

Entry for this contest is now over!

Watch this page for more details about the winners as they pass through each round!

Contest Details

The time has come for our Seton student-writers to plunge into a new form for our next contest!  Yes, we are asking for Shakespearean sonnets!

Students are asked to write on one of three possible topics:

  • The Empty Tomb.
  • Christ disguised as a gardener.
  • Christ grilling fish for the Apostles’ picnic by the lake.

Each of these require some theological thought; they are all in Scripture for a reason, after all!

You may wish to consult commentaries, but do not be afraid to think through the incidents by yourself and develop your own personal reactions.

The deadline for submissions is April 30.  Winners will be announced and published on June 1.

When you’re ready, submit away! Any questions, post in the comments below. :)


Open to Seton high school students, grades 9-12. Pick one of three Easter-related topics, and start crafting your submission.

Sonnets are very structured, with definite patterns and length. Topic details and a sonnet tutorial is available online.

Submissions will be judged by grade level, with two finalists for each grade level (unless no entries of distinction are found).

Submission Deadline

April 30th, 2016

Prizes

1st Place: $50 | 2nd Place: $35

1st & 2nd place awarded in each high school grade level.

Contest Details & Sonnet Explanation

How to Write a Sonnet

One of our English counselors put together a handy guide to crafting a sonnet. It’s really important that you read it right here.

The form to follow is a bit complex.

The iambic foot is a simple rhythmic pattern, ta-DUM, as in perHAPS.  The number of feet in a line can vary, but Shakespeare used five feet per line, called pentameter in poetry-speak.

The rhythm of the sonnet is then iambic pentameter, which follows the sound pattern
ta-DUM ta-DUM ta-DUM ta-DUM ta-DUM, as in “I ALL aLONE beWEEP my OUTcast STATE (from Shakespeare’s sonnet XXIX).

Each line should generally follow the same iambic pattern, with a total of 10 syllables.

The sonnet consists of 14 lines, with a rhyme scheme as follows:
AB AB CD CD EF EF GG; the rhymes in Sonnet XXIX are these:
Eyes, state; cries, fate; hope, possess’d; scope, least (often pronounced “lest” here); despising, state; arising, gate; brings, kings.

It may be noticed that “despising” and “arising” do not follow the strict iambic pattern.  In fact the two lines containing these words are slight variations simply to break the routine of the sound and wake up the reader or listener; these lines actually have eleven syllables rather than ten.

Such small variations are allowable in order to keep the reader or listener on their toes.  A good poet uses such devices sparingly but tellingly, as does Shakespeare.

The indentation, to keep it simple, should be limited to only the last two lines, the concluding couplet.  There are other possibilities, but it will make judging a lot easier if all the entries are uniform.

A great help both in defining the form and in finding the rhymes is The Complete Rhyming Dictionary, edited by Clement Wood.  Find the edition that includes the detailed discussion of poetic forms; much valuable information about poetry in general is to be found in this book.

Students with even the slightest interest in poetry are urged to place this volume beside their dictionary and thesaurus.

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